Sunday, 20th April 2014

Joe “Shine” Amabile And Mondo Fosco

Posted on 08. May, 2012 by in History, Organized Crime

I have authored some difficult articles in my nearly five-years of writing for American News Post, however, this one takes the cake.

Those of you who are steady readers of American News Post would be familiar with Theodore Roe, one of my literary contributors here at ANP. Those who are extremely knowledgeable on the history of the Chicago Outfit might recall another Theodore Roe, the 30s and 40s era African-American policy boss from the South Side. This Theodore (better known as “Teddy”) Roe was an Outfit murder victim who was permanently silenced on August 4, 1952. In a sense, I feel as if I am offering the late murder victim the opportunity of having a voice by helping the Roe of American News Post to be heard. ANP’s Theo Roe is a good journalist who attacks corruption (especially Chicago area corruption) in both the church and state. As you continue to read this article, you will discover why I feel strongly about Teddy Roe.

teddyroe2 236x300 Joe “Shine” Amabile And Mondo Fosco

Teddy Roe

Teddy Roe’s story is a fascinating one, and I suggest that if you are not familiar with it, you learn a thing or two about him before proceeding with this article.

There was an Outfit member who was a very close friend to Outfit Chief Sam Giancana, by the name of Leonard “Fats” Caifano, a.k.a. Lenny. Many people, including Giancana, believed Teddy Roe murdered Lenny. Giancana was, to put it mildly, over-the-moon livid because of the death of his friend. Needless to say, Giancana was more interested than ever in eliminating Roe.

It has long been a mystery who exactly knocked down Teddy Roe. Numerous names of Outfit members have surfaced as likely suspects in his murder. Jack Cerone, Willie Messino, Joe Gagliano, Joe Ferriola and James “Turk” Torello have all been mentioned at one time or another. Heck, Willie Messino told me himself that law-enforcement hung him out of a fourth story window by his ankles trying to force a confession out of him for the murder of Roe.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Theodore-Roe/100000750079320 Theodore Roe

    Excellent story, Joe.

    In a bit of a preemptive move, I would like to state that I am of no relation (or, none that I know of, at least) of Teddy Roe.  I think this has come up before, but I’m not sure if it was ever answered.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      I understand Theo, thank you for the comment. 

      • doug

        Try again…. I apologize for inserting these general type questions in such a specific story such as this. Not meaning to derail the conversation. I made the below post in another story a few days ago. This was my first ever posting and I wanted to make sure I was using this properly. Yes I am also impatient and anxious to see if anyone replies. Thanks again for letting me be out of order

        Just  wanted to say I just stumbled across this site in the past
        week and really appreciate the work and the contributions that are on
        here. The information is just fascinating and truly expands on, and
        answers a lot of questions that one may be left with after reading the
        popular information that is out there re: The Chicago Outfit. If I may
        ask some basic questions that are still confusing to me as to the order
        of leaders of this group after Capone and their relationships to each
        other. I guess I’ll just unravel what I’ve learned or observed as true
        and you can straighten it up from there.

        -After Capone, Nitti seemed to be the figurehead leader but Ricca was actually in charge?

        - Ricca was jailed not long after and Accardo took over.

        - Accardo wants to “retire” 1957? and Giancana becomes boss.

        In some of the post postings I’ve gathered that some on here believe
        that Giancana  was a much more powerful boss than Accardo was so it is
        confusing to me did Accardo agree to step aside or did Giancana take
        over?

        During Giancana’s time at the top did he have the final word or did he answer to Ricca and Accardo?

        When Giancana went to Mexico was that because he was kicked out of
        leadership or was that a mutual agreed upon thing to take the spotlight
        away from the organization?

        Some accounts lead you to believe that from sometime in the early
        40′s until he died in 1992 that nothing “major” could ever go on in
        this organization without Accardo’s blessing or approval. Is that an
        accurate statement?

        INCOME?

        Are these organizations set up in such a way that the boss is always
        guaranteed to have the top income even though it seems that many of
        them are not actively involved or can guys lower in the organization
        earn more income than those above them?

        Finally, except when Accardo when to court on a tax situation and he
        named his occupation as “beer salesman,”  was it ever portrayed to the
        public what guys like Ricca, Giancana  and other supposedly did for a
        living?

        I shall stop there. That is probably more than enough to start with. I really appreciate any input you folks have. Thank you

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          Dear Doug,
          Paul preferred Sam to JB, which is the reason Sam (Mooney) took over the top spot. JB was loyal and followed orders like any good soldier wood. Mooney was in charge but Paul had the final word on important matters.
          I stated somewhere in the threads when JB had parties at his home on Franklin, all the ‘guys’ and their family members greeted Paul, paying respect, prior to greeting JB.
          Mooney was kicked out the night he was murdered. According to some of my sources, Mooney lost his mind in a sense, forgetting he was boss, thinking he was a celebrity. He spent too much time in California and Mexico, which played a significant part in the decision to kick him out. Whenever ‘guys’ needed to see him, he was out of town. Paul did not mind, but other people like Joey O and Jack, who were greedier than most, wanted to get business done, however found themselves waiting to connect with the boss (Mooney), while he was out of town. Once Paul died, Jack and Joey O put together a crew, which included JB, which is when Mooney was knocked down. Individuals who harbored resentment against Moony for being Paul’s golden boy for many years led the crew that knocked Mooney down.
          Mooney could care less about Joe B’s approval. However, Paul liked Joe B and allowed Joe to weigh in on decisions. Once Joey O and Jack took over, both agreed to rely on Joe B for advice, but both could have (and in numerous cases) disregarded JB’s advice at will.
          As far as how the income is divided, in recent years (speaking about my personal knowledge relating to the poker machine business), John DiFronzo and his purported under boss, Joey A, received a low 6-figure cut on an annual basis, which equaled my late friend Buddy Ciotti’s monthly cut (this payment scheme is the polar opposite of how things were done during the Aiuppa/Cerone faction, but Mooney allowed everyone to make money, which was another thing that Aiuppa and Cerone hated).
          As to employment, Paul was a waiter, lol. I do not recall hearing any occupation for Paul (besides waiting tables) other than his role as a professional gambler. Back in the day (the 50s) when my Uncle Romie was a bookmaker (among other things), Paul used to place bets through him as a gambler. Paul liked the ponies.

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          Dear Doug,
          Paul preferred Sam to JB, which is the reason Sam (Mooney) took over the top spot. JB was loyal and followed orders like any good soldier wood. Mooney was in charge but Paul had the final word on important matters.
          I stated somewhere in the threads when JB had parties at his home on Franklin, all the ‘guys’ and their family members greeted Paul, paying respect, prior to greeting JB.
          Mooney was kicked out the night he was murdered. According to some of my sources, Mooney lost his mind in a sense, forgetting he was boss, thinking he was a celebrity. He spent too much time in California and Mexico, which played a significant part in the decision to kick him out. Whenever ‘guys’ needed to see him, he was out of town. Paul did not mind, but other people like Joey O and Jack, who were greedier than most, wanted to get business done, however found themselves waiting to connect with the boss (Mooney), while he was out of town. Once Paul died, Jack and Joey O put together a crew, which included JB, which is when Mooney was knocked down. Individuals who harbored resentment against Moony for being Paul’s golden boy for many years led the crew that knocked Mooney down.
          Mooney could care less about Joe B’s approval. However, Paul liked Joe B and allowed Joe to weigh in on decisions. Once Joey O and Jack took over, both agreed to rely on Joe B for advice, but both could have (and in numerous cases) disregarded JB’s advice at will.
          As far as how the income is divided, in recent years (speaking about my personal knowledge relating to the poker machine business), John DiFronzo and his purported under boss, Joey A, received a low 6-figure cut on an annual basis, which equaled my late friend Buddy Ciotti’s monthly cut (this payment scheme is the polar opposite of how things were done during the Aiuppa/Cerone faction, but Mooney allowed everyone to make money, which was another thing that Aiuppa and Cerone hated).
          As to employment, Paul was a waiter, lol. I do not recall hearing any occupation for Paul (besides waiting tables) other than his role as a professional gambler. Back in the day (the 50s) when my Uncle Romie was a bookmaker (among other things), Paul used to place bets through him as a gambler. Paul liked the ponies.

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          Dear Doug,
          Paul preferred Sam to JB, which is the reason Sam (Mooney) took over the top spot. JB was loyal and followed orders like any good soldier wood. Mooney was in charge but Paul had the final word on important matters.
          I stated somewhere in the threads when JB had parties at his home on Franklin, all the ‘guys’ and their family members greeted Paul, paying respect, prior to greeting JB.
          Mooney was kicked out the night he was murdered. According to some of my sources, Mooney lost his mind in a sense, forgetting he was boss, thinking he was a celebrity. He spent too much time in California and Mexico, which played a significant part in the decision to kick him out. Whenever ‘guys’ needed to see him, he was out of town. Paul did not mind, but other people like Joey O and Jack, who were greedier than most, wanted to get business done, however found themselves waiting to connect with the boss (Mooney), while he was out of town. Once Paul died, Jack and Joey O put together a crew, which included JB, which is when Mooney was knocked down. Individuals who harbored resentment against Moony for being Paul’s golden boy for many years led the crew that knocked Mooney down.
          Mooney could care less about Joe B’s approval. However, Paul liked Joe B and allowed Joe to weigh in on decisions. Once Joey O and Jack took over, both agreed to rely on Joe B for advice, but both could have (and in numerous cases) disregarded JB’s advice at will.
          As far as how the income is divided, in recent years (speaking about my personal knowledge relating to the poker machine business), John DiFronzo and his purported under boss, Joey A, received a low 6-figure cut on an annual basis, which equaled my late friend Buddy Ciotti’s monthly cut (this payment scheme is the polar opposite of how things were done during the Aiuppa/Cerone faction, but Mooney allowed everyone to make money, which was another thing that Aiuppa and Cerone hated).
          As to employment, Paul was a waiter, lol. I do not recall hearing any occupation for Paul (besides waiting tables) other than his role as a professional gambler. Back in the day (the 50s) when my Uncle Romie was a bookmaker (among other things), Paul used to place bets through him as a gambler. Paul liked the ponies.

          • doug

            Thank you very much Mr. Fosco for you prompt reply. I really enjoy this web site and the information on here. I’m looking forward to reading the other articles and comments. I believe that I saw somewhere along the way that you were working on a book? Have you completed that? If not is that still in the works? Thank you again.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            I have not even started it yet. It wont take long to write.

          • Taylor St.

            Doug,  Basically agree with Fosco’s answer.  Mooney was the day to day Boss of the Taylor St. Crew which ran the Outfit.  Paul Ricca was also part of the Taylor St. Crew and was Mooney’s advisor.  Mooney didn’t need Accardo’s approval for anything.  Accardo was the advisor and semi-retired Underboss who mentored  Cerone who became the  Boss of the Elmwood Park Crew because of Accardo.  The Elmwood Park Crew was subservient to the Taylor St. extended powerhouse crew as were the Cicero Crew, Rush St. Crew & Chicago Heights Crews. The top Boss of the Outfit who is also the Boss of the Dominent Crew,  makes the most money.

          • Allen James

            Has there ever been a boss from the south or Chicago heights???   I ran back to long ago, and cant think of one.  Most came from Taylor/grand, Elmwood and cicero kinda seem to tie in 2nd

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Frank LaPorte and Al Pilotto were the only two heavyweights from the South that I could think of off hand.

          • Allen James

            Are you saying that Joey O and Jack, as you call them, where a head of JB???  I can see Paul, and Nitti be for, even Mooney when some say JB stepped back, you say Paul wanted him number one.   But once Mooney, and Paul where both dead.  I would think JB was clearly top dog, even though he went to consig

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Jack and Joey O went to Joe B for help knocking Mooney down. They needed someone like Butch Blasi to get to Mooney. Both Joey O and Jack knew that if anyone could persuade Butch to turn on Mooney it would be Joe B. With all 3-men aligned (Joe B, Joey O and Jack), Butch was coerced into jumping ship. All Butch had to do was remain loyal to Mooney and things would have been much different. With Mooney gone, Joey O and Jack were the undisputed rulers of the Outfit. They were grateful to Joe B for his help with Butch and interested in his random advice on business. However, make no mistake, Joe B was as powerful as Joey O and Jack allowed because of their loyalty to him. I suppose, Joe B was in some way an honorary boss over the Outfit, thanks to Joey O and Jack. Again, Joe B had as much power as Joey O and Jack would allow him. For instance, if Joe B wanted to knock down Joey O and Jack, he would have had either to kill them himself or convince them to commit suicide.
            Back to the Mooney hit: Joe B was ripe for the job of knocking down Mooney, because of the rivalry between the two of them over who could get further with Paul (in previous years). If Mooney did not have his head so far up his ass, he would have lived a lot longer and things would have been different. Butch would have likely remained loyal. The timing was just not right for Mooney.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            I would say the boss of bosses of the Chicago Outfit is like this (I will go as far back as Capone):

            Capone (until he lost his sanity)
            Campagna (until death)
            Ricca (until death)
            Giancana (until death)
            Aiuppa (until death)
            DiFronzo or Lombardo (current)

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Ricca was the longest serving boss of bosses in Outfit history. Next to him, Giancana was the longest serving underboss. Others like Joe B and Teets were periodical acting underbosses, when Mooney was too heated up, or busy out of the country. After Paul’s death, the Outfit was left for Mooney to fully control. However, Joe B Joey O and Jack stopped playing by the rules, hijacking the organization for them. This move would (according to the Outfit) be considered as bad as turning governments witness. Proof of this 3-man crew’s treachery is told in my article titled, Aiuppa Orders It, Armand’s Delivers., where I point out that Aiuppa refrained from killing his partner/underboss, Jack, for many years out of respect for Joe B.

          • Father Guido

            Joe,
            I think your list of Bosses is acurate.  What is also Different about the Bosses before Aiuppa is that they had many guys under them with lot’s of power and freedom to earn.  Capone, Ricca, Giancana had many big names who ran vast rackets and made Millions, Claude Maddux,Bobby Taylor, Ross Prio, Battaglia, Buccieri, LaPorte, Accardo.  These guys were allowed to earn, and Capone, Ricca, and Giancana were visionary leaders in the sense that they allowed their underlings to find and develop new rackets and rule them.  Auippa through his greed brought to the Outfit intense prosecutions and convictions of top guys.  Ferriola, Carlisi, and LaPietra were very much Auippa disciples.  Lombardo and DiFronzo having come up under Ricca and Giancana seemed to realize that their best chance of survival was to shrink the rackets, and be happy with a lesser cut and exposure.  I think that you will be able to outline this in your book.  As much as I despise the Outfit, it was the most successful and powerful syndicate in US history and how these men murdered and schemed to corrupt  entire Cities, Unions, and industries is quite an amazing story.  Write the book.

          • Joseph Fosco

            DiFronzo came up under Cerone/Accardo.

          • Father Guido

            Understood.  Difronzo may have appreciated in his later years, how Paul operated out of the limelight.  I would speculate that Lombardo admired Mooney’s flash.  To me Campagna was an incredible Gangster.  Not much is known about him in the mainstream, but he was Capone’s wartime Consigliere (Godfather phrase)  He was very close with Capezio, I understand.  The wives co-owned a flower shop.  Accardo admired Lou very much, but Lou understood that Paul should run the Outfit after him.

          • Taylor St.

            Totally agree with Fosco. Accardo/Cerone was rooted in the original Grand Ave. Crew years before it basically centered around Elmwood Park.  DiFronzo came from Grand Ave. DiFronzo in his early years was a made guy who operated under Cerone/ Acardo.  He would not have had too much contact directly with Ricca accept on maybe some social occasions. DiFronzo belonged to Cerone/Accardo. Ricca was the Chairman and was rooted in the West Side crew which became known as the Taylor St. Crew. Ricca/ Giancana were Taylor St. Accardo/Cerone were Elmwood Park. Ricca was the man until he died in 1972, case closed. 

          • Joseph Fosco

            In fact, I cannot imagine Lombardo and/or DiFronzo even having access to Ricca. By the early 70s, when Paul died, he was not making new friends. People who got close to him did so many years prior to his passing. Therefore, DiFronzo and Lombardo would have had to initiated a friendship with Ricca sometime in the 60s, when both men where nowhere near the level of stature to do so. I cannot speak as much for Lombardo’s history as I can for DiFronzo’s, but I would say that Cerone would not have had any reason to allow Difronzo to have a relationship with Ricca, especially in the 60s (I would believe the same for Lombardo, who was with Milwaukee Phil in the 60s).

          • R W

             This matches what an informant said back in the late 1950s, but it’s confusion because normally a boss also sits on the Commission.  Now the people from Chicago who sat on the Commission were:
            Capone (1931 only)
            Ricca (1931-1947)
            Accardo (1947-1957)
            Giancana (1957-1966)
             During Giancana’s time Chicago became less involved with the national Commission and may not have participated after him.  There is some additional confusion with the list because:

            Capone (probably more likely he was boss until he went to Alcatraz and had very limited communication to even his family)
            Campagna (died in 1955)
            Ricca (died in 1972)
            Giancana (slain in 1975 — most sources say he wasn’t considered part of the Outfit from 1966 on, and when he returned to Chicago he was a member with no rank; other sources also claim that Battaglia and Alderisio before Aiuppa — but for very brief periods)
            Aiuppa, etc

            I’m also confused because in a previous post you seemed to agree with what other guys wrote that Nitti was a top boss after Capone.  Perhaps the arrangement was more like a senior/top boss and a junior boss, and the junior boss served on the national Commission.  So it would be something like this:

            Capone – boss (until 1931/32)
            Nitti – top boss (1931/32-43); Ricca – jr boss (1931/32-47)
            Campagna – top (1943-55); Ricca – jr (1931/32-47)
            Campagna, Ricca – top (1947-55); Accardo – jr (1947-57)
            Ricca – top (1955-72); Giancana – jr (1957-66)

            Just my two cents.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Dear Rick,
            Do not be persuaded by who was perceived to have sat on the commission or not perceived to have done so. The selected or non-selected board members of the commission were strategically calculated as a way to keep various individuals protected.
            My knowledge of Outfit history does not go back further than Capone, because, Capone is as far back as my resources go, obviously.
            In past conversations on this topic, I have been guilty of associating some Outfit figureheads (such as people like Nitti) into the list of boss of bosses. Therefore, I wish to clarify my position for the record right now.
            Below are the bosses of bosses, period.
            Capone was boss until his mind diminished.
            Campagna took it over after Capone faded out. I have living sources, who were children of some of the old Capos and underbosses, which included Accardo, Aiuppa, Nitti, Giancana, Capezio and others, who used to visit Campagna at his farm in Barren Springs, Michigan, to take their orders. Campagna has a daughter who, today, lives in or near Arizona. In fact, her husband once took Joe B down for some money in the early 50s. Nothing ever happened to him, and he is probably still alive today.
            Paul took the spot after Campagna died. Paul used a number of underbosses in his nearly 20-year term as boss of bosses. Do you really think Mooney and Joe B would resign their positions to each other and somehow reclaim them? Come on. This was the work of Paul, repositioning certain people as he saw fit.
            After Paul’s death, in a sense, the Outfit went up for grabs, however, Mooney had the most power, coupled with the fact that the outgoing Paul preferred Mooney’s leadership over everyone else’s, which automatically made him the chosen one to succeed Paul.
            The Aiuppa/Cerone faction (with the endorsement of Accardo – all driven by greed), murdered Mooney’s Lou Cabratzi; also know as Dyno. In other words, the assignation of Mooney’s guy (again, Dyno) meant that a hit was on Aiuppa, Cerone and Accardo. The three renegades (the 3 Jays) had only one way to survive; and we know what their plan was.
            After Mooney died, Aiuppa took the leadership, which lasted until the day he died. In the past, I thought it was possible that bosses such as Aiuppa gave up their positions once imprisoned. Due to particular findings, I know that that is not correct.
            After Aiuppa’s death, only one man is left standing as boss, and he gives interviews to Chuck Goudie on ABC news, which I think, shows us where the Chicago Outfit is today.

          • R W

             There was an article in the Chicago Tribune in 1959, based on the informant I mentioned, who spoke of “The Man” and “The Boss.”  “The Man” was the top boss, the Chairman, and “The Boss” was the shot-caller.  He said that “The Man” was Campagna, then Ricca, then Giancana.  He said “The Boss” was Ricca, then Accardo, then Giancana.  Giancana held both spots.  No mention of Nitti at all.  This seems to match what you wrote in an email that Nitti was a capo (of which group?).  Capezio was also a capo and he died in 1955.  What confuses about that is that didn’t Accardo belong to the same group as Capezio?  I wonder too which groups Capezio and Accardo were in charge of.  To me, the early period is as confusing as the later, but it’s a fascinating period nevertheless.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            After Paul became boss, he used all the known individuals, who appeared as boss, as his under boss. In some cases, he had other types of bosses, who took on the character of boss. Bottom line, no one told Paul what to do after Lefty died. And, everyone did what Paul wanted them to do until the day he died.

          • Taylor St.

            Accardo & Capezio belonged to the old Grand Ave. Crew. The west Side Crew led by Ricca was always the Dominent until Mooney was gone. Chicago poer Structure is by Crews, not by individuals. The individual is nothing without the power and support of his Crew. That’s why Giancana got killed in 1975. He was a man WITH NO POWER BASE.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            I do not agree that Giancana was without a power base. I think Milwaukee Phil, Daddono, Nicoletti, Dyno, English, Butch, Teets and several others, would make up a reasonable power base. Giancana was murdered because the Rat (Butch) was weak for Accardo. If the rat was as strong as he was supposed to be, Accardo, Aiuppa and Cerone would have been murdered in the 70s, not Giancana.

          • Allenjames

            Campagna, who is this>>>?? I know a guy who is in his 90s that owns most of ROselle a suburb in IL.  LIterally owns acres or acres that he sells little by little, getting richer and richer

        • Allen James

          Wasnt Nitti the boss, but the commission told Paul R hes boss in there eyes?  Wasnt until Nitti was gone that Chicago saw Paul R as the man, IMO.   Nitti was older then Capone, but wasnt from Sicily. A larger thing then then it is now…

          • R W

             Neither Capone nor Ricca nor Nitti were Sicilian.  Nitti was a cousin of Capone if that means anything.  Giancana and Accardo did have Sicilian parents, Aiuppa too, I believe.  Prio was born in Palermo.  There are apparently more people of Sicilian ancestry in the Outfit than people realize, but am not sure if it makes a difference these days.

          • Allenjames

            Ricca was from the eastern part of Sicily 

          • Antiliar

            Ricca was from Naples. There is a record for him. He was born Felice DeLucia and killed a man in Naples then came to America under an assumed name. According to one or two sources Ricca may have been connected with the Camorra in Naples.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Thank you Antiliar.

  • Pagliaccio

    This took strength to write, Joe.   One of the best pieces on this site.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Pags,
      Thank you for your kind words.

  • Max power


    In addition, during his early years with the Chicago Outfit, my father was deeply involved in a major construction company”..  Can you expound on this?

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Dear Max,

      My father and the owners of Nash Brothers Construction allegedly schemed in a ghost payroll system for a period of my father’s employment with the company during the early 1950s (which I consider a deep or solid connection).

      Apparently, my father always made sure he was on a payroll in order to keep
      Uncle Sam happy. I thought I would mention the connection because, ironically, Roe had a connection to the same network, which could be found on Roe’s Wikipedia page.
      In addition, I think the topic in general does an interesting job of exposing the interworking of the Irish-American factions and the Chicago Outfit (whoops).

      • Max power

        Thanks Joe.

  • Outfit Observer

    How is your father different from any of the other Outfit guys who committed murder? Sounds to me like he was scum like the rest. Maybe some of the other guys saw a priest before they died and confessed their terrible sins. Your father wasn’t the only one. I’m sure he was a good father to you, but what about Teddy Roe’s children? Your father was scum and mentally unstabble to commit murder because somone ordered him to do it. Sorry, but those are the cold hard facts.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Dear OO,
      Perhaps you missed paragraph 19. Thanks you for your input. J

  • Taylor St.

    Alderisio, Nicoletti, Daddono, Amabile, Fosco, Pranno, DeGrazia  were all made guys in Battaglia’s Crew and were all part of the extension of the Taylor Street Group which ran the whole Outfit back at that time under Giancana. It would make sense that Giancana would use experienced men from ” His Crew ” to make sure the job was done. Giancana would not have used anyone else from the other crews, in particular, Cerone’s Crew. Giancana’s power base was Taylor St. and his top muscle were guys like Battaglia, Bucciere, DeStefano, Caifano etc. Some men were direct with Giancana like DeStefano and Marshall Caifano who were  very prolific killers. Other men worked under Battaglia and Bucciere.  I grew up in that area and know all about it.  

  • Pingback: Mr. Armando “Mondo” Fosco Sr.

  • five finger discount man

    Nice work Joe. Did anyone replace Romie Nappi as the polotical mastermind for the Outfit?

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      One of the men that my late uncle groomed for the job is with Chicago’s new mayor nearly every day of the week, now that he is retired from politics (retired from his official office). Unfortunately, I promised him that I would not write about him anymore.
      My now late uncle and he met at the old Angel’s Restaurant (on Harlem Ave, a few blocks North of Grand Avenue) every morning for years in the 1980s and early 90s.

  • Allen James

    Id like to add I wish I didnt have such a common white guy name.  Ive seen three other guys that use names that could be taken as me:) 

    • Zippity do da

      Dear Joe,

      Does the mob still exist here in chicago? I mean it has been stated that they do, but do they really? Other than a bunch of loosely affiliated old men languishing around simply because they haven’t all yet died off, you just don’t hear much about them anymore. In other words, in your estimation, are any of them still active? And if so, what are they active in?
      Also, if a known “outfit guy” is “on their own” and not under anyone; how does that work? Does that just mean that the guy has been deactivated and is simply working on his own either legitimately or illegitimately. In the past, didn’t they all belong to a crew and kick up to a boss.
      Any input would be appreciated. I’m just attempting to get a better sense of how the modern day mob works.

      Thanks

      • Zippity do da

        Dear Joe,

        sorry to bug you again, but I keep checking for your reply and was wondering if you could answer my questions. you always bring interesting perspective to the dinner table. Again, any input would be greatly appreciated. It just seems like the NYC guys are always on the news and the midwestern guys are not which causes me to speculate. Thanks.
        P.s. I enjoy reading the comments on here from time to time. What ever happened to Black Angelo?

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          I submitted my response to your previous questions a few minutes ago. As for Black Angelo, I have no knowledge of his whereabouts (I hope the Outfit did not get him). Thank you.

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        Of course, the Outfit/Mob still exists in Chicago. When the human mind could no longer be brainwashed, the Outfit will soon die.
        Juice loans, book making, prostitution, poker machines, other gambling and various swindles, are continually providing revenue for the Outfit.
        The power of the various ‘made’ guys who are alive today depends on the strength (if still living) of their boss(s).
        Aside from your concerns on how it all works (the street stuff), my concerns are focused on the governmental agencies (local and state), and the agencies who have Outfit cronies on payrolls, which in turn bring other cronies on to taxpayer-funded payrolls (such as their sons and daughters). As long as Outfit beneficiaries continue to hold jobs in government, favors will always be handed out to Outfit figures and their associates (this particular area is still rampant).

        • doug

          Hey Joe, I was just reading a story about Eddie Jones one of the big numbers guys back in the old days. It talked about how he and his brothers used the profits from that business to buy rental properties and other businesses to make legitimate income. You hear these same types of examples over and over with many of these guys.

          I’ve never understood how these guys with apparent modest backgrounds, apparently not working all of a sudden begin purchasing and investing money like crazy into things that are legitimate, “on the record” Can you explain how that happens? How does this not raise eyebrows or throw up red flags all over the place? Especially, my guess is things are done with cash, correct? Aren’t dealings in large sums of cash to make transactions in the legitimate world a red flag in itself or were things different years ago?

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Dear Doug,
            Sure, today, large cash increments are eyebrow lifting. In addition, criminals would likely use the names of others (individuals or corporations) to list as owners of property and/or luxury items.

          • Allen J

            Dats how D’amico dose it, has property all the F over in family memebers

        • Allen James

          Didnt lumpy get his kid that isnt in vegas a nice city works job?

  • RickW

    Great article Joe.  Obviously a very personal one.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      I appreciate it Rick; and thanks for everything.

  • Horsey F@rt

    Joe,

    How are you? Apparently, the trailer for the new mob wives TV program has been released, accessible here: http://www.tvovermind.com/mob-wives-chicago/mob_wives_chicago_supertrailer/

    I don’t imagine you’ll have much to say about it, but I found the trailer to be worth watching for the unintentional comedy factor. Anyhow, even for someone like me who is a connoisseur of weirdness and insanity, the actual show itself looks like it will be terrible–probably even unwatchable. Only in America do social deviants individuals with no grasp of reality whatsoever get rewarded with their own television series.

    Take care, man.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Dear HF,

      Nice to hear from you. Thanks for the info on Mob Wives, however, you guessed right; I have no personal interest in watching it. Perhaps, if the cast included the wives of the DiFronzos and Joe Lombardo, I would reconsider (as it would be something to truly learn from in relation to a very interesting culture). From what I understand, the cast of Mob Wives is purely for entertainment value. I am not apposed to being entertained, but, this time I agree with Lou Rago (despite his occasional contradictions), it is not a good show for the Italian-American women in our society who are mainstream and otherwise classy people. Nonetheless, I understand that there is money to make for the cast members, and what they are doing is not illegal (I suppose it is better than shooting raunchy porn).

  • Horsey F@rt

    By the way, I recently saw a new movie called The Last Rites of Joe May that was filmed in Joe Lump’s old neighborhood, featuring Chicago actors, including Dennis Farina. It’s about an old-time hustler on his last legs who has a very tenuous connection to some Outfit figures. After a lifetime of being something of a scumbag, the guy makes an attempt to redeem himself. Who wouldn’t like a story like that? I got it from Chicago Public Library.

    It’s a really great movie in every sense of the word. 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYpCp1_abqY 

    • Mr. Jingledonkey

      “Dennis ‘Joe May’ Farina” (LOL LOL) –that MOTHER!

  • R W

    Noticed that Mike Magnafichi was picked for shoplifting earlier this month.  That can’t be good.

     http://napervillemugshots.com/mug/michael-magnafichi
    http://www.dupagemugshots.com/Mugshots/Michael_magnafichi/429-5abb683e6435aa39af0e4c28b3b96f43

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Dear R,
      Since the time Michael started dating his previous girlfriend (over 10-years ago), he has been battling a prescription drug addiction that Dr. Joseph Giacchino allegedly made increasingly worse in the last few years.

      • R W

         Why would anyone be involved with that guy after all you’ve been through?  If that’s the source of his current problems then he needs to go to rehab.

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          Rick,
          Michael involved himself with Giacchino when Fratto began using Giacchino as a tool against me. Michael was there to serve as my eyes and ears into the matter. Allegedly, Giacchino quickly realized that Michael had a girlfriend who appreciated painkillers, and the rest is history.
          I tend to keep my distance from Michael when he is using. Sometimes he stays off the stuff for long periods, but when he is on, he is on a mission. Any lawyer who represents a person like Giacchino is (in my opinion) greedy.

      • Allenjames

        I was hooked for over a decade and owe my life to a doc that is amazing and not one of those toss norco’s at everyone so the DEA stays off there ballls.  I sent his info in a private message, if you want it again id gladly sent it again

  • Letemrde

    oh lord god i couldnt even get through that whole mob wives trailer.  This outing by the Graziano daughters is a joke.  At least MBW Nyc you had Hector Pagans ex wife slash New york Giants 2nd team lineman, and you got Lee Dvanzo’s wife, at least both of these guys were active and in Hectors case up until the most recent time his father in laws apparent mouthpiece.  However this, Joe first off im surprised they got Nora sober enough to put together lines (and did anyone approach Anita to star in this, did she have more brains) and i honestly thought deep down Karen Fratto was gonna pop up in the casting, they certainly can use the money.  Did they approach her, she can be the only i can see actually considering it.  I mean while they were at it why didnt the just get nigger joe’s daughter to star in it, shes got plenty of time on her hands these days, and hell the only with at least something of her own legacy/infamy.  These other 3 are not even worth mentioning im just sick there getting paid to make fools of themselves and the city as well as the Italian culture they disgrace on their own.  Hey but maybe i half expected Giachhino’s wife to get casted on this, they’d be more relevant than any of em (plus she has at least several “acting techniques” in her repetoire to at least bring some experience).  Hope all is well my friend take car.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Rudy’s wife would have been a reason for me to watch, at least he is a half ass gangster. I agree, Giacchino’s wife had more standing to be casted. lol

  • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

    Dear Tootsie,
    Honestly, I do not miss anything about the Outfit and/or her nightlife excitement.
    I had good times in my past as I continue to experience good times. My good times are my good times, not anyone else’s. The movies actually depict what its like to enjoy power. I would point out that power could come from many other sources. I have plenty of late nights in my current lifestyle; just ask one of my nanny’s. Lol
    The beautiful women, social drinking, fancy cars (though rented limousines these days, great meals, wining and dining at nice restaurants and nightclubs, spending money, etc, are still a very real part of my life. Unfortunately, there was a brief period where my finances were compromised, but, that is in the past as well. I was never much of a gambler, I admittedly do not dance as much as I used to dance and I do miss some of the male bonding, but do not miss whom I bonded with in the past (the male bonding has diminished, not ended).
    Anyone of you in ANP readershipville, provided, you are not an enemy, are more than welcome to me be my guest for a night on the town. I promise you that you will be satisfied.
    One does not have to be involved in the Outfit to enjoy the things that I have listed above.
    I suppose I was considered an associate of the Outfit. However, I had deep personal relations with some made members, although, I refrained from committing felonies.
    I hope this gives you a little insight.
    Oh, as far as fancy clothes, by choice, I usually dress causal these days and I was never big on jewelry, with the exception of sporting a good watch, which I continue to do. :- )

  • Joseph Fosco

    Rick,
    Paul’s son Anthony and my fathers son Ralph (named after the late Ralph Nappi, Romie’s older brother, who would have been a major Outfit boss if he would have lived longer), suffered from serious forms of mental illness. Once during a private meeting, Paul told my father, “Our sons are our cross in life to bear.” Little did they know that I would one day have American News Post? Lol

    • R W

       Leave it to God to provide life with ironies.

  • Taylor St.

    Joe Fosco,  Good List of Top Bosses.  However, you forgot Carlisi.  Carlisi was the Boss of the Cicero Crew and Top Boss of the Outfit after Auippa. Thank God you did not put down Ferriola’s name. He was never the Top Boss of the Outfit like everybody thinks. Whenever I look at some book or article about the Outfit, if I see Ferriola mentioned as the Top Boss of the Outfit, I stop reading and dismiss the book or article as bullshit in the same way you do if you do not see Romi Nappi’s name mentioned!   

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      I did not forget to add Carlisi. I decided not to add him. I believe (despite popular opinion) that Aiuppa remained his boss, which means that Aiuppa was the boss, not Carlisi, which is why I did not name him as boss of bosses.

  • Taylor St.

    I noticed some confusion and comments by a couple of readers. The Chicago Outfit is Structured by the order of power with the Street Crews. The individual is in big trouble when he has lost the respect and power and support of his crew which is his power base. That’s why I Agree with Fosco that in 1996 when Cerone got out of jail, he probably would have been mudered. Why? Because he had lost the respect and power base of his Elmwood Park Crew and his mentor and guardian who was also part of the Elmwood Park crew, Joe Batters, was dead.  Cerone was now a man without a power base just like Giancana was in 1975!  The Outfit is not structured like the New York Mafia. Stop thinking of Chicago as individual men in power positions. That only causes mass confusion and contradictions. Think of Ricca & Giancana  as the Bosses of the Taylor St. Crew  which dominated the Outfit which is why they were the two Top men. It was because of their POWER BASE called Taylor St.  Later, Auippa & Cerone formed a partnership and their respective POWER BASES were Cicero & Elmwood Park.  Joe Batters was with them and was their advisor.  A Boss is nothing without his POWER BASE in Chicago.

    • R W

       I get the concept of power bases.  The underboss was the guy in charge of the second most powerful crew and the boss headed the most powerful one.  I was after the names and their sequences.  I’m trying to get an understanding of the hierarchy of the Outfit from its beginning.  Nitti is usually said to be the top boss.  I am wondering if it is possible that Campagna took over for Nitti in 1943 and Ricca maintained an underboss position until Campagna died, but perhaps by changing crews he took over for Campagna.  Just speculation.

      I also have to wonder about Frankie Rio, who died in 1935.  Seems like he would have been an important guy until his death.  Regarding Capezio, most accounts have it that he mentored Accardo and was his capo, but Capezio lived until 1955 (same year Campagna died).  If Accardo was underboss and Commission representative from 1947-57, how could he be under Capezio since they were both in the Grand Avenue crew?  Jack McGurn also seems to be associated with them, but lost his power when Capone went to prison.

      • Allenjames

        Mcgurn lost his power when he lost his $$$.. BEcame a liability when he did

    • Allenjames

      Speaking of power bases… Where did the pizza man come from, torn-a-bene   SOrry I suck at spelling

  • Taylor St.

    Joe Fosco,  I think you misunderstood me. When I said Giancana had no power base anymore, I meant in 1975!  In 1975,  Ricca was dead,  Battaglia was dead,  Alderisio was dead,  Bucciere was dead,  DeStefano was dead,  and Daddono was in jail.   Back in 1957 to 1966, Mooney had a very strong power base that  I’ve commented on before and was absolutely untouchable.  I agree with you about Blasi, that was a sad day when he betrayed Giancana in 1975.  

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Now that you have clarified yourself, your view on Giancana’s power base seems more compelling. Originally, it appeared as if you were speaking of his power base in general. In addition, I would add, there are plenty of others (sleepers), who were capable of doing heavy work, who were loyal to Giancana, who were still alive when he was murdered. However, yes, he did lose some of his favorites, as we know from historical facts published in various places over the years.

  • Taylor St.

    Joe Fosco,  I disagree with your opinion  that Auippa was still the Top Boss of the Outfit after he went to jail.  Auippa & Cerone were Advisors when they were in prison from 1986 to 1997. The Top two Bosses were Carlisi & DiFronzo. When a Top Boss in the Outfit goes away for a long time and he already is basically an old man, he becomes a respected Advisor from prison. Auippa and Cerone were no longer the two Top Bosses of the Outfit from 1986 forward.   

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Dear Taylor Street,
      Unlike you, I am not asserting procedures on the Outfit as if I have an official manual in front of me. However, I am basing my statements on real experiences that I have lived through. I saw the look of worry on the faces of Outfit individuals when Joey O was released (or even Jack for that matter). Johnny and Joey A were walking around like a couple of kids unsure of how they were going to clean up the house before mom and dad returned from their trip to Wisconsin for the weekend. I was present with Outfit members who discussed the theory of “what is Joey O going to do? Who he is going to name as new Capo, underboss, etc?” I have friends who took orders from Joey O while he was in prison. These same friends would not listen to the people that you listed (when it appeared as if you were reading from the manual), instead they listened to Joey O.
      You are arguing terminology with me. You are calling Jack and Joey O “advisors.” I am calling Aiuppa the “genuine boss.” Bottom line, Aiuppa influenced DiFronzo and Carlisi to do whatever he wanted them to do (whether they liked it or not). Therefore, I do not care what way you slice it or dice it; Aiuppa was the “genuine boss.”
      I appreciate your comments, I find your mysterious Wizard of Oz style amusing, your identity, credentials, experiences and other merits are of course unknown. For all I know you could be The Don, who was banned from here for inappropriate behavior, or you could be my soon to be ex-wife who is interested in splitting hairs and making frivolous arguments. lol

  • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

    Dear RW,

    As I recently told the commenter called “Taylor Street,” making a distinction that one was an “advisor” and the other is the “boss,” is not the way to look at it. Its hairsplitting and wasteful arguing of terminology. The players in question did not refer to the others as “my advisor.” These people had names. Their titles were irrelevant. Paul had a name; it was Paul, not boss, not advisor, etcetera. The same for Lou. Low was Lou. However, when Lou talked, everyone did what he said. Therefore, he was the boss, but he was Lou. When Paul spoke, everyone did what he wanted. When Aiuppa spoke, everyone did what he wanted, even when he was in jail. Sure, we could sit around until the end of time and speculate to what degree of leadership he entrusted in Carlisi and DiFronzo, but we will never know the details. So why bother? It is better to simply accept that Aiuppa was the person that everyone took orders from, period.

    In an earlier comment that you made, which I have yet to respond (until now), you mentioned that Nitti took over for Capone. In the past, I have appeared to agree with such theory, however, I have recently clarified that I did so in a general sense, as in ‘yes, Nitti was a power base with extreme power’. However, I would reiterate that my sources, who actually spent time on Lou’s farm in Barren Springs, Michigan, in the early 40s, remember vividly, Lou was in charge during meetings when individuals as Giancana, Ricca and Nitti were present. On that note, there is nothing that a Wizard of Oz commenter, news article, or FBI agent authored book, could get me to believe differently from what I know via credible sources who were there to see and hear first hand. In addition, if anyone suggests that I am fabricating this information to make a good story, or to appear as an expert, I would question their sanity for reading any of my work (if that is how they truly feel).

    You (and others) call it ‘advising’, I call it bearding. The difference is, I am right.

    • R W

       Thanks Joe.  Insider information like what you provide is greatly appreciated.  If your sources say that Nitti was only a capo, do they know what crew he led and who took over?

      As for advising, I know that Taylor Street and others use it, but we all have a need to label things and to categorize to help us understand.  There was some sort of hierarchy, some sort of chain of command, and I think that’s what we’re getting at.  Maybe the labels existed but were rarely used, or just used for the benefit of outsiders or other organized crime families.

      And no need to address me as RW, you know that I’m Rick and you can use my name.  Sometimes I comment on newspaper stories with my initials and the automatic name that I post with somehow ends up here and I just click on it.  You know who I am and I’m not hiding :-)

    • R W

       By “bearding” you mean something like “The American slang term originally referred to anyone who acted on
      behalf of another, in any transaction, to conceal a person’s true
      identity.”

      So in this case I think you’re saying that Nitti was the beard for Campagna.  Some people would call that a “front boss.”  The question about that is what’s in it for someone to be a beard and take all the heat from law enforcement while (in theory) the actual boss is protected?  I guess if Lefty told Nitti to pretend that he’s the boss to outsiders then Nitti is going to do what he’s told, but what’s in it for Nitti in that case?  Not saying you’re wrong, just trying to understand.

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        Correct. Joe Nick was Sam Carlisi’s beard. There were actual Outfit guys who thought Joe Nick was the boss when Carlisi was running things for Joey O.

    • Allenjames

      lou who>?

  • R W

    Just thought I’d share this.  According to a guy who goes by the moniker Pete83 on another forum this is the current Chicago setup:

     Consiglieri/Advisor John Difronzo
    Advisor Marco D’amico
    Advisor Joe Andriacchi

    Street Boss Mike Sarno

    Acting Street Boss Salvatore Cataudella

    Elmwood Park Street Boss Rudy Fratto

    Grand Avenue Street Boss Albert Vena

    Cicero/Melrose Park Street Boss Salvatore Delaurentis

    26th Street/Chinatown Street Boss Frank Caruso

    John Matassa reports directly to John Difronzo and runs a subcrew on the Northside

    • Horsey F@rt

      Seems like this info was gleaned from conversations occurring on these threads over the past 24-months.

    • Horsey F@rt

      I think “Street Boss” and “Cicero/Melrose Park Street Boss” are actually all the same “position.” There are definitely some serious names on this list, but I think it’s too rigid of a structure. Close to half of these guys are not even active, in my opinion. (Interestingly, at least 3 of these guys live in Westchester.) 

    • Horsey F@rt

      Joe, what do you make of the idea of “Pudgy” being direct with DiFronzo? It’s hard to imagine. I believe that the Don mentioned something once along the same lines. Black Ang argued that he was Marco’s driver after VT passed away, I think. 

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        Its possible Pudgy is direct with Johnny. Who did the Don say was Marco’s driver after Vic died?

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Marco is nothing but a gambler, who is taking some of Tony Dote’s action.
      Joe Andriacchi is mostly out of the action.
      My thoughts on Solly D is on hold.

      • Tootsie Baby

        Joe,
        Is Tony a capo? A made guy? Does he have his own crew?

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          Capo, lol, no. Crew? I am sure he has some flunkies who kiss his ass.

          • Allenjames

            tony who>?

  • Horsey F@rt

    Joe,

    Can you go into some detail about “bearding,” or is it really just as straightforward as advising? I’ve heard this term used before but never knew exactly what it meant. I believe one of the Marcello bros. referred to someone as “a beard” or “the Beard,” and another time gestured with a hand to the chin or side of the face or something. In what circles is the “term” bearding used? Did Willie use this term?

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Read my recent response to R W.
      I actually heard Buddy Ciotti and Jack Cerone (esq) use the term beard.

  • Potbelly

    Joe or whoever can answer,

    What is the relationship between the different crews?  I know that some people don’t like each other, that’s just the way the world is, but were the crew bosses ever worried about who was more powerful or who had a bigger crew or who was making more money? Did they have tenuous relationships or were they work like relationships?

    Also, did each different crew know who was in other crews or who was in charge of the other crews? Like, would the soldiers in the 26th street crew know who was a soldier in the Elmwood Park crew? Or was that info kept close to the vest? Would a soldier in one crew know who the boss in another crew was?

    Also, when crews are designated by area, does that mean they can’t do any other business in an area? Could a solider from chinatown take sports bets from people near elmwood park? Does the chinatown crew own everything in that area, no matter the activity or is that just there crew and they can operate anywhere in the city?

    Thanks.

    • Joseph Fosco

      Dear Pot,
      Unlike The Don, who speaks as if he is reading from the Outfit corporate manual when he explains things (there is nothing of such), your questions are unreasonable (please do not be offended). You see, every interaction between a crew and/or a boss and his underling is done on a case-by-case basis. Perhaps if you posed different questions, naming specific bosses and/or crews and/or situations, I would be able to find you a more informed explanation. Thank you.
       

  • Horsey F@rt

    Joe, did my eyes deceive me, or did I see you walking southbound on Mannheim Rd in a Western Suburb this afternoon?

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      If I am ever caught walking down Mannheim Road, you have my permission to run me over. lol

  • Horsey F@rt

    Joe, did my eyes deceive me, or did I see you walking southbound on Mannheim Rd in a Western Suburb this afternoon?

  • Letemrde

    This is a structure question that i actually find interesting and is not as dumb as it sounds.  During the transitional period post prohibition to the layout of things really up until now, at least in terms of crews e.g. This is twilight days of Capone with Nitti and Ricca making up the real day to day work, Laporte= chicago heights  Prio= North side  Ralph Capone=Cicero/Melrose   Bruno Roti/Skids Caruso=26th st.  Esposito/Ricca/Moe (Just cuz Esposito got killed during that transition and was “Mal Vita” early on)=Taylor st.  Now the question 2 crews missing and the one i can offer only assumption, but is GRAND AVE and I guess the guys who would have followed, did the Elmwood Park crew just start as extended Grand Ave.  and then become the ivy league through time.  If i remember Joe wasn’t the Eagle born around Grand Ave Smith field area, same with Accardo.  So did the Elmwood Park crew spawn out of there when Jack moved to Elmwood Park or before.  This time period is interesting cause you have so much happening territorial transition wise and things kind of get lost in logistics and just appear when the dust settles.  Hope all is well, i kind of feel like i hope to run into you for a drink but my lexicon and knowledge iam afraid would beget a disappointing time for you.  Either way hope all is well my friend . 

    • Joseph Fosco

      Right, EP crew became what it is because the hierarchy moved to the area from their original location, Grand Avenue.
      Having a drink with you sometime would be a delightful experience, regardless of the levels of your lexicon or knowledge.

    • Tootsie Babe

      Dear Joe,

      I’m surprised this has never been mentioned on here before. Very interesting stuff to say the least. Your thoughts?
      http://theeprovocateur.blogspot.com/2010/06/tony-demasi-and-chicago-way.html

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        I saw it before. Someone either posted it in the threads here at ANP or emailed it to me. Thanks for the note.

    • Allenjames

      Speaking of crews. where did the pizza man tornabene come up in?>>>  ANy idea

  • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

    The delirious Don once accused me of being dishonest about
    my civil RICO case, indicating that I was willingly involved in a legitimate
    business investment that I lost money on with Dr. Giacchino and others; and
    therefore concocted an Outfit extortion plot as a scheme to make up my loss
    (lol, as if I would not have sued the criminals for fraud if he was correct).

    Perhaps listening to Giacchino talk to me here,    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=2f1_-EZEiJI,
    is what caused the delirious Don to think I was willingly involved in a
    business investment. lol

  • Logic

    Joe–Back in 1984 there was a drug murder near Elgin, IL.  Two men (Aldo Fratto and his nephew Tullio Infelise) were killed while buying cocaine from Dino Titone, Robert Gacho and Joseph Sorrentino.  It was a very grisly murder where the victims were lead away to their deaths with hands bound.  Below is the newpaper article.  Given the two familiar last names of the victims–Fratto and Infelise–do you know if these were related to the Outfit?  

    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1998-07-11/news/9807110155_1_murder-plot-convicted-trial 

    • Big Nose

      Dear Joe and Logic,

      I just watched an episode of Mob Wives Chicago. It was one of the Koolest things that these eyes have ever seen! What do you guys think?

      Also, I was just wanting to know your guys opinion about me joining the mob. I was thinking about seeking some of these guys out and possible joining. I think it would be fun. I just want to be kool, and I think that being a made guy would be kool. Your thoughts? I could never do anything violent or against the law but maybe I could simply hang out with them and wear a pinky ring and look kool and such. How do I become a member. Please advise.

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        Dear Ms Big,
        I will forward this note along to Joe Lombardi’s nephew (The Don), as he would be the best person to address your concerns. On behalf of American News Post, thank you for your readership.

      • Kkanz

        give me 10 grand,i will burn you with a cigarette,cut ur wrist,and give you control of your block….

        • Pagliaccio

          I’ll do it for 5K

        • Big Nose

          Dear Mr. Kkanz,

          Control of my block?!? This is Chicago not New York. Anyway, being burnt by a cigarette or having my wrist cut does not appeal to me. Nor does the idea of handing over 10K.

          Joe, seriously, I want to possibly join the mob. How do I do this? It just seems like these people lead an interesting and exciting life. I want the same thing. Its like I told you before, I could never do anything violent or unlawful. I just want to be kool and wear a pinky ring and such. I also want to mingle with wiseguys because they are kool and have good lives. Who knows, maybe I could make it all the way up to made guy? I might just be the next Anthony Accardo or Momo Giancana (2 very successful people who never did any significant jail time). Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

          • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

            Mr (or Ms) Big,

            You are asking me to perform a service for you. Perhaps I should point out that ANP is not a charity. However, since you are obviously a reader of mine, I will consider your request. In the meantime, we need to get you a nice pinky ring. I have a friend who is a reputable jeweler that would be glad to allow me to broker the legitimate sale of such ring. My suggestion is that you go with a 3-carat diamond, which will run you about 35-thousand dollars, minus the setting. The setting, I assume you would want in platinum. Therefore, we would add on another 5-grand. If you want to go up in size or down, simply add or subtract about 11-grand per carat. Unfortunately, I would require a minimum of 10% down in order to get started with building your Outfit pinky ring. Please provide a certified check made payable Hale Rosenberg, however you may send it to ANP’s office (which you could find on our contact page) and I will personally forward it to Hale (don’t forget to include your ring size). In the meantime, we will hold off on discussing your other requests until we have the ring ready to go. Thank you and I look forward to doing jewelry-business with you.

            PS, the prices above include sales tax, which I think is a good deal, especially because the quality of the stone will be impressive. You will see.

            Side note: from this point, now that we are doing business, please go directly to my email address with any additional information. As a policy I do not conduct business over the message boards, therefore, I will no longer allow your comments on said matter in the threads. Thank you.

      • Allenjames

        lol….

    • Logic

      Joe any response to my question?  

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        I will look into it. Sorry for taking some time to get back to you.

  • Joseph Fosco

    With Sandusky’s recent guilty finding, Gacy moves to second place and former Melrose Park Police Chief, Vito Scavo, goes to third. The three most prolific criminals that I know of would be these three men. Sandusky now has 45 felony convictions, Gacy has 33 and Scavo trails with 22.

    • Johnny Come Lately

      Comparing Scavo to Sandusky & Gacy is ridiculous, don’t you think?  Why do you hate Scavo? What did he do against you? Please don’t say that he extorted money from you. I’m not a Scavo fan, but your comparison is highly unfair to Scavo. I know Scavo was a crook, but so was President Bush and Dick Cheney who were much worse than Scavo.

      • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

        Johnny (I hope not DiFronzo),
        Comparing the nation’s most corrupt police chief (based on his large number of felony convictions – nearly 2 dozen) to the nation’s worst serial killer and pedophile is actually quite fitting. Each convict is an alpha in his distinct area. Now I would not compare any of the three villains to people like Bush and Cheney who are not convicted felons. You are clearly the one who is being unfair.

  • Allenjames

    http://listverse.com/2012/06/05/top-15-crime-bosses-and-drug-lords-in-2012/You probably have seen this, but I got a kick out of it

  • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

    Good question Allen…

    I will put it like this. I have no regrets in life and if I had a chance to do it all over, I would be doing what I am doing now.

    If the D’s did not victimize me, who knows where I would be right now?

  • Allenjames

    IM so computer mental, whast I was trying to get the link to.  Just go to google and do “fifteen top crime bosses and drug lords of 2012
    JD is bottom on the list, but stil pretty good reading

  • Allenjames

    You need to look into Judge Daniel R MIranda or Maybrook court houses.  HE dose nice favors for not only mafia people, but just any Italians.  Ive heard people in his own court complain about it.  The man is awful, DOSE NOTHING>   THey did a story about him filing 40 hours a week, when he did 20.  But sense then nothing has been done about him, but the man is ruining kids left qand right, and not only in cases of those who are in orgranized cime

  • RickW

    From poster Ivan at RealDeal is a list of murders allegedly committed by Harry Aleman:

     Chicago Crime Commission claims Harry Aleman was involved in killing,
    though I think his involvement in the Cain killing has since been
    discredited IIRC.

    Also, it should be noted that the CCC is frequently full of crap. So this list might be exaggerated and/or incomplete.

    Anyway, here’s the list…

    Oct.
    19, 1971: Samuel Cesario, AKA Sambo, clubbed and shot to death by two
    masked men as he sat with his wife in lawn chairs in front of 1071 W.
    Polk St in Chicago. Cesario was Aleman’s uncle. Butch Petrocelli was
    said to assist in the killing. Police suspect that Cesario had secretly
    married the girlfriend of Felix “Milwaukee Phil” Alderisio after he was
    sent to prison.
    Sept. 27, 1972: William Logan, 37, a Teamsters union
    shop steward and ex-husband of Aleman’s cousin, shot to death with a
    shotgun in front of his home at 5916 W. Walton St.
    Dec. 20, 1973:
    Richard Cain, 49, a top aide to then-high-ranking organized-crime boss
    Sam “Momo” Giancana, shot gunned at point-blank range by two masked men
    in Rose’s Sandwich Shop, 1117 W. Grand Ave.
    Feb. 24, 1974: Socrates
    “Sam” Rantis, 43, a counterfeiter, found with his throat slashed and
    with puncture wounds in his chest in the trunk of his wife’s car at
    O’Hare airport.
    April 21, 1974: William Simone, 29, a counterfeiter,
    found in the back seat of his car near 2446 S. Kedvale Ave., with his
    hands and feet bound and a gunshot wound in the head.
    Sept. 28,
    1974: Robert Harder, 39, a jewel thief and burglar who had become an
    informant, found shot in the face in a bean field near Dwight, Ill. He
    once escaped an assassination attempt by Aleman and a partner, James
    Inendino.
    Jan. 16, 1975: Carlo Divivo, 46, a mob enforcer, cut down
    by two masked men who opened fire with a shotgun and a pistol as he
    walked out of his home at 3631 N. Nora Ave.
    May 12, 1975: Ronald
    Magliano, 43, an underworld fence, found blindfolded and shot behind the
    left ear in his burning home at 6232 S. Kilpatrick Ave.
    June 19,
    1975: Christopher Cardi, 43, a former police officer who made
    high-interest loans to gamblers, shot eight times in the back and once
    in the face by two masked men as his wife and children looked on inside
    Jim’s Beef Stand in Melrose Park.
    Aug. 28, 1975: Frank Goulakos, 47,
    a federal informant, shot six times by a masked man who stepped out of a
    car as Goulakos walked to his car near DiLeo’s Restaurant, 5700 N.
    Central Ave., where he was a cook.
    Aug. 30, 1975: Nick “Keggie”
    Galanos, 48, a bookmaker, found shot nine times in the head in the
    basement of his home at 6801 W. Wabansia Ave.
    Oct. 31, 1975: Anthony
    Reitinger, 34, a bookmaker, shot to death in Mama Luna’s restaurant,
    4846 W. Fullerton Ave., by two masked men.
    Jan. 31, 1976: Louis
    DeBartolo, 29, a gambler deeply in debt, found shot in the head and with
    his neck punctured four times with a broken mop handle in the rear of
    the store where he worked at 5945 W. North Ave.
    May 1, 1976: James
    Erwin, 28, an ex-convict who was suspected in the murders of two other
    reputed mobsters, cut down by two masked men with a shotgun and a .45
    caliber pistol. He was shot 13 times as he stepped out of his car at
    1873 N. Halsted St.
    July 22, 1976: David Bonadonna, 61, a Kansas
    City, Mo., businessman, fatally shot and found in his car trunk there.
    His murder was one of several unsolved mob-related slayings that year in
    an apparent mob attempt to infiltrate nightclubs featuring go-go girls.

    March 29, 1977: Chuckie Nicoletti, one of Sam Giancana’s favorite
    men, he was shot three times in the back of the head while sitting in
    his car parked at Golden Horns Restaurant, 409 E. North Ave., Northlake
    Illinois.
    June 15, 1977: Joseph Frank Theo, a burglar involved in
    stolen auto parts, found with two shotgun wounds to the head in the back
    seat of a car parked at 1700 N. Cleveland Avenue in Chicago

    • RickW

       In an older Chicago Tribune or Sun-Times article the Samuel Cesario killing was attributed to Tony Spilotro.  So, somewhere along the line Spilotro was removed as a suspect and replaced with Aleman.  I won’t try to explain it, I’m just reporting it.

  • Anonymous

    Joe–Have you ever heard of Vito Caliendo?  Any background on he and his nephew Anthony?

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      Yes, I heard of Vito.

      • Anonymous

        Was Vito made and is he active currently?  I have friends who are in business with the family and are having problems. 

        • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

          Log…,
          I am not sure. I will see what i could learn.

  • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

    Dear Five Finger…,
    Are you suggesting that crime historians simply conclude that probably every single Chicago Outfit murder victim who was killed by a shotgun and/or a knife and/or rope to the throat during the adulthood of both Harry Aleman and Frank Calabrese Sr (of course, during the times Aleman and Calabrese were not incarcerated) were in fact murdered by Aleman and Calabrese? If so, I would disagree with you. Furthermore, are you implying that Butch and Harry were the only Outfit killers who used a .45? If so, I am not buying it. I appreciate your offerings, but respectfully disagree.

  • Father Guido

    Joe, Have you heard of  Leone J. Flosi, an FBI agent who went to law school with your old buddy Cerone the lawyer, not the gangster. I guess he did some good work on Strawman and the Pizza Connection cases.

    • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

      No, Father, don’t know much about him.

  • http://www.americannewspost.com Joseph Fosco

    Dear Pot…,
    First, the chart you are referring to, including every chart that I have ever seen for that matter, is highly inaccurate. However, yes, Turk would know what position Joe Lump held and visa versa.
    Dominic Senese belonged to my Uncle Romie and his close cohorts (which included Accardo), period.

    • Sam From Buffalo

      That’s not what you originally said when the chart was created by The Don & Horsey Fart. Because you got mad at them, now you say the chart is inaccurate. Again, this doesn’t make you look good. There are many comments where you say the chart is very promising, especially the first chart concerning Taylor St. I think the charts are not perfect, but overall are pretty f…ing good. Why don’t you create your own chart if you think you can improve it?